Dag's Land Rover Series iia swb

dagabba

Supporting Member
Hello everyone!

This is my first venture into the Offroad section for quite a while... very excited.

After seeing some lovely Landie builds recently (@Fourth Protocol) I've been feeling the need to have a go myself. I have built a hacked up Raffee before but have been wanting to go earlier, shorter and scratchier.

We've also managed to book a holiday in the Welsh countryside- fingers crossed it will actually happen- and I like making holiday trucks. And old Series should look nicely at home in the Welsh hills. Unfortunately I only have two months to build this... and my last scratch build is approaching the 1 year mark... hmm... will it be painted? Will it have a roof? Will it have doors? Will it just be a cardboard box? Maybe I should do a poll if I can work out how?!?
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
The good news is it will definitely run. I've scavenged my old Raffee D110 for gearbox, axles, etc. First thought was to use a Raffee D90 chassis but these are designed for links and this is going to be leafie. So, having enjoyed some @JMo builds recently I've gone with what I think she uses- an ebay special.

20210618_151147.jpg


The finishing is quite a way off the RC4WD/Raffee aluminium chassis but look at all those holes!!! So many setup options!!

Next I worked out my dimensions- unsurprisingly width/length/wheelbase are all at slightly different scales but I've settled on 1/8.5. I would have preferred 1/9 but the oily bits are just too big. Also printed out a (very) rough blueprint in the correct size and cut my first templates:

20210618_151257.jpg


And here are the first styrene cuts, so much excite!

20210618_151605.jpg


Cheers all!
 
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JMo

V.I.P. Member
Hi Dagabba - my* ears are burning - glad to hear you like those Injora chassis, like you say - I find them very versatile for building a leaf, link or a combination of both chassis without having to drill much if anything.

As an observation - you don't really need to keep that low-slung linkage transfer-case mount on a leaf-sprung build - RC4WD offer a number of lower-profile alternatives (without the lugs for the links too), and there is also the Boom Racing 'low profile' version of the one you have (which I've used on my TJ Wrangler with links/coils), or even something like this:


...which can mount a variety of transmissions/transfer cases (including the traditional SCX10 3-gear type, and the RC4WD Hammer transfer cases) - the only thing to consider is your prop-shaft angles will be slightly higher with a higher mounted tranfercase of course.

Hope that helps!

*and in the interests of avoiding any ambiguity in future, I think I'd better start signing my name at the ends of posts!

Jenny ( the J in JMo)
 
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dagabba

Supporting Member
Hi Dagabba - my* ears are burning - glad to hear you like those Injora chassis, like you say - I find them very versatile for building a leaf, link or a combination of both chassis without having to drill much if anything.

As an observation - you don't really need to keep that low-slung linkage transfer-case mount on a leaf-sprung build - RC4WD offer a number of lower-profile alternatives (without the lugs for the links too), and there is also the Boom Racing 'low profile' version of the one you have (which I've used on my TJ Wrangler with links/coils), or even something like this:


...which can mount a variety of transmissions/transfer cases (including the traditional SCX10 3-gear type, and the RC4WD Hammer transfer cases) - the only thing to consider is your prop-shaft angles will be slightly higher with a higher mounted tranfercase of course.

Hope that helps!

*and in the interests of avoiding any ambiguity in future, I think I'd better start signing my name at the ends of posts!

Jenny ( the J in JMo)
Good info, I need to have a look at mechanicals at some point- I'll probably want it sitting quite a bit lower too which will help driveshaft angles.

And so sorry to wrongly assume, thanks Jenny!
 

JMo

V.I.P. Member
Good info, I need to have a look at mechanicals at some point- I'll probably want it sitting quite a bit lower too which will help driveshaft angles.

And so sorry to wrongly assume, thanks Jenny!

No worries - we're a rarity on here I'm sure ;o)

If you want to drop the overall height - and again this is something I've experimented with various leaf-sprung builds over the years, consider getting some shorter shackles compared to the ones in your photos (the ones you get with those ebay spring kits are particularly long - although note you can lower the rear ones a good degree if you mount them directly to the holes in the chassis rails rather than any brackets ) - the stock RC4WD Trailfinder II shackles are significantly shorter, but pretty expensive - alternatively also look at the leaf spring kits for the 1:14 scale Semi-trucks, as those have the same width/hardware size, just typically have shorter leaves (around 104mm eye to eye) and shorter shackles too. That way you are well stocked to adjust the wheelbase and ride-height to suit your needs.

Looking forward to seeing how this progresses!

Jenny
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
No worries - we're a rarity on here I'm sure ;o)

If you want to drop the overall height - and again this is something I've experimented with various leaf-sprung builds over the years, consider getting some shorter shackles compared to the ones in your photos (the ones you get with those ebay spring kits are particularly long - although note you can lower the rear ones a good degree if you mount them directly to the holes in the chassis rails rather than any brackets ) - the stock RC4WD Trailfinder II shackles are significantly shorter, but pretty expensive - alternatively also look at the leaf spring kits for the 1:14 scale Semi-trucks, as those have the same width/hardware size, just typically have shorter leaves (around 104mm eye to eye) and shorter shackles too. That way you are well stocked to adjust the wheelbase and ride-height to suit your needs.

Looking forward to seeing how this progresses!

Jenny
Thanks for this Jenny. I've ordered some 1/14 sets, the shorter leaves might be helpful too.
 
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dagabba

Supporting Member
Made some decent progress over the weekend. I thought a front bulkhead would be a good place to start, and to hang the rest of the build from.

It's a pretty key component of a Land Rover, and an achilles heel: I'm sure everyone knows the bodies are aluminium and element proof, well the bulkhead is steel so these commonly disintegrate from the inside out. Replacements are therefore common giving me plenty of source material on the web.

Many are aftermarket with subtle differences but I've decided to go with this one. Mostly because there are good pics. And it's shiny.
land-rover-series-2a-bulkhead-front-view-web.jpg
land-rover-series-2a-bulkhead-rear-view-web.jpg

It's mostly been layering/boxing up work but I was a bit stressed about getting the vent/screen angle right so I made some little jigs up:
20210622_214323.jpg

Here's my version, fun work so far:
20210622_214540.jpg
20210622_214658.jpg
20210622_214623.jpg
20210622_214643.jpg
 
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JMo

V.I.P. Member
That is fantastic!

Now rust it all over!

ps. I'm sure you know, but for anyone else unaware - as Dagabba explains, while the majority of the Defender's body panels are aluminium, the bulkhead is actually steel (as are the door hinges) - and if you're planning on weathering one, while the aluminium itself doesn't rust, over time (and British weather particularly) and especially where the steel and aluminium butt-up against one-another (typically between the bulkhead and the doors, and also the front wings and scuttle/hood) damp and road-salt leads to a chemical reaction which means the aluminium panels tend to develop a crusty white powder under the paint, which eventually peels off leaving the raw and deteriorating metal underneath. As an illustation, this is something I endeavoured to replicate with my own Defender 90 build a while back.

Gotta love 'em!

Jenny
 
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TLC

Scaled, but not fishy.
That's poetry in styrene right there mate ::2thumbs :cool2:
I will enjoy watching this build come together. :popcorn:
 

Badcrumble

Supporting Member
I had an inkling to try a styrene Landie build.
Then I saw this. :cool:
Think I'll stick with my tractor for the moment.
Are you using a guillotine or another tool to get such precise cuts?
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
Thanks so much everyone, much niceness!

That is fantastic!

Now rust it all over!

ps. I'm sure you know, but for anyone else unaware - as Dagabba explains, while the majority of the Defender's body panels are aluminium, the bulkhead is actually steel (as are the door hinges) - and if you're planning on weathering one, while the aluminium itself doesn't rust, over time (and British weather particularly) and especially where the steel and aluminium butt-up against one-another (typically between the bulkhead and the doors, and also the front wings and scuttle/hood) damp and road-salt leads to a chemical reaction which means the aluminium panels tend to develop a crusty white powder under the paint, which eventually peels off leaving the raw and deteriorating metal underneath. As an illustation, this is something I endeavoured to replicate with my own Defender 90 build a while back.

Gotta love 'em!

Jenny
Thanks Jenny. Yeah, I need to work out rust options- might try bolting bits together rather than glueing so I can do a different finish for different metals...
Superb start. A Defender build is coming up soon for me. Looking forward to the progression.
Thanks! Look forward to seeing your Defender come to life!
That's poetry in styrene right there mate ::2thumbs :cool2:
I will enjoy watching this build come together. :popcorn:
Thanks mate!
Yeah ok I've just hidden my SIII under the bed :ashamed: Looks awesome already :luv:
Thanks Fourth but.. nah, I love your SIII! Maybe they'll meet one day? Though mine is going to be more Mule than Camel...
Wow! Incredible work!
Thanks!
I had an inkling to try a styrene Landie build.
Then I saw this. :cool:
Think I'll stick with my tractor for the moment.
Are you using a guillotine or another tool to get such precise cuts?
Ah go for it! They're good for two reasons- very boxy and essentially put together like big meccano.
Just a simple firewall... ;)

Looks amazing sir.
Thank you sir guy!
if this is the start i cant't wait so see the finished body :luv:
Thanks, me too! Needs to happen in a rush... but the aim is to make it like a 1:1 resto, if I've only got a seat and a bulkhead it's still a Land Rover, right?
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
To come back to Badcrumble's question- no guillotine, just a sharp hobby knife and a steel ruler. I've been learning how important it is to measure and mark multiple times, then the cutting and joining is much smoother. Lots of sanding too and anywhere there's a little gap (like on an angled joint that I haven't quite sanded perfectly) melt in a thin bit of styrene with solvent then sand it smooth.

So far going it's smoother than the Volvo, less repair work which slows you down massively. Here's the first markings on the bulkhead:
20210618_213419.jpg


And the start of the rear end:
20210623_222338.jpg


Trying to form grids to divide things up and work out relative positions.
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
Oh one more thing, can anyone recommend a good micro servo for turning the steering wheel? I'm a bit scared of them blowing up all the time.
 

Fourth Protocol

V.I.P. Member
Oh one more thing, can anyone recommend a good micro servo for turning the steering wheel? I'm a bit scared of them blowing up all the time.
Sooo I have an Emax ES08A Micro Servo (€ 8 and change for one) in a build somewhere, and I also have Micro SG90 Servo Motor 9G mini for RC helicopters and aircraft in a few others. I bought a pack of 10 for ~ € 16. And I've not had any of them die on me. They do spend more time on the shelf than off it, though.
 
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