Micro MORR Corvair

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
This is my first attempt at a build thread, and I'm not really sure it's in the right place, since this is mostly a 3D modelling/printing job with minimal hand-crafting. If the mods choose to move it, I'll totally understand.

Anyway, the origin of this vehicle is the Matt's Off-Road Recovery (MORR) YouTube channel. Their original (current) star vehicle is a customized XJ affectionately known as the yellow banana, which has already been built by several people in these forums. In the last few months, they've been working on a scratch-built serious off-roader based on a Corvair Lakewood (station wagon) body. I fell in love with the new Corvair build immediately, and I've been working on a plan ever since. At the rate their build is going, I may finish the model before they finish the 1:1!

Here's a Corvair Lakewood in good condition:
1961-Chevrolet-Corvair-Lakewood-Wagon-smaller.jpg

Here are a couple photos of their build in progress, to give a sense of what they're up to:
Screenshot_20201208-221220.jpg
Screenshot_20201214-005533.jpg
Screenshot_20201220-231833.jpg

I was able to find a good 3D model of a Corvair Lakewood as a starting point, but it was missing some details that I thought really stood out on a the Corvair. First I added the air intake vents near the back windows, and then I expanded the wheel wells, added fender flares, etc. Here's a quick snapshot of the 3D modelling evolution.
CorvairBody_1-1_19e_B4-After.jpg

Those headlight bezels in particular were an interesting challenge for me. Here's a closeup of what they should look like. Mine are definitely not right, but maybe close enough for 1:24 scale?
s-l225.jpg

One oddity is that the Corvair was rear-engined, but this off-road build is front-engined, so it needs a grill, which the original didn't have. Their grill was still a work in progress when I started on mine, so I just took a little creative license and made it follow the original car's contours pretty closely. I also chose to include the front emblem, which I originally thought MORR was also going to include, although more recent videos would seem to indicate otherwise. Either way, it made my final cut, and here's the model I sent out for 3D printing (along with a rendering of an SCX24 frame and tires that match the size I plan to run.)
CorvairBody_1-1_32-body-and-SCX24-A.jpg

The tires are going to be a little too big, and the stance a little too tall to be a really accurate scale model, but it was the best I could without getting into major chassis modifications, etc. I'm only about a year into this hobby, and this is my third RC crawler, but they've all been RTRs with Lexan bodies until now. This is my first hardbody, so I wanted to keep things relatively easy for my first time out.
 

2Beers

It's me again.
Owning a 1963 convertible 1:1..Red with White top and interior 20 years ago....
This to me is awesome.

Can't wait to see this one evolve.
I do like me a covair. 4x4 even better ahahahaaa
watching closely.
 

dagabba

Supporting Member
Very interesting! What scale will it be?

I'm guessing you could simply scale up the stls if you ever wanted a 1/10 (1/9) version?
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
I like were this is going. Definitely will be awaiting the progress.

Sent from my SM-A520W using Tapatalk
Thanks!

Owning a 1963 convertible 1:1..Red with White top and interior 20 years ago....
This to me is awesome.

Can't wait to see this one evolve.
I do like me a covair. 4x4 even better ahahahaaa
watching closely.
Thanks! I'm honored, and a little intimidated, by your interest. I've seen a bunch of your builds here and they're out of this world.

Very interesting! What scale will it be?

I'm guessing you could simply scale up the stls if you ever wanted a 1/10 (1/9) version?
This scale works out to 1:21.88. I do very much want to build a roughly 1:10-ish version, probably on an SCX10.2 chassis just because it's the only one I know and I'm really happy with it so far. The only reasons I went SCX24 instead of SCX10 on this first build were price (this hobby gets expensive fast!) and being able to make the body a single print instead of multiple prints with more assembly and seams to clean up.

Currently the shell is about 2mm thick, and if I simply scale it up in the software I've got, that would be roughly 5mm thick, which seems pretty excessive. I'd need different software (or a little outside help) to easily and cleanly change the shell thickness, but I think that should be trivial for people who know what they're doing. I'm very comfortable with more geometric 3D modelling, and absolutely love parametric modelling (like Solidworks, Inventor, etc.) but have very little knowledge of manipulating meshes.

I'll share a little more info on scaling, mating this design to the SCX24 chassis, etc. in my next post, but unfortunately have to get to work now...

***EDIT: I originally had a typo indicating 1:21.8 scale, when in fact it's closer to 1:21.88 (actual scaling was done with multiplication by 0.0457)
 
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ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
I decided early on that I wanted this to be something that could very easily attach to a bone-stock SCX24 chassis, which meant scaling the body to make the wheelbase match that of the SCX24. This is what forced the odd 1:21.88 scale. At this scale RC4WD Falken Wildpeak tires (50.3mm OD) are roughly equivalent to 43" tires. I believe the actual rig is running 40" tires, so not horribly far off, but definitely a noticeable difference. There are a few even smaller tires to choose from, but they're all quite a bit wider, resulting in weird looking aspect ratios, so I settled on Wildpeaks, at least to start.

I already had an SCX24 Deadbolt when I started this project, and originally planned to simply make a new body for that rig... but as I analyzed the body geometry, tire size, ride height, and internal components, it became clear that the electronics were riding way too high - I'd have to re-arrange things quite a bit, or be stuck with the body riding way higher than I'd like. Then I found out that the Deadbolt has a different chassis layout than the JLU. The JLU ESC rides significantly lower, so I designed around that specifically (I believe the C10 has the exact same parts and layout as the JLU, just with different bumpers and tires, but I haven't physically confirmed it.)

Deadbolt chassis:
IMG_3073-small.jpg

JLU chassis:
IMG_3084-small.jpg

After waiting forever for a back-ordered SCX24 JLU to arrive, I measured and modelled all of the relevant bits so that I could figure out attachment points, fit wheel-wells around the frame, etc. Here's the 3D model of the frame, along with two custom pieces I designed which attach to the frame rails at the standard bumper mounting points and hold magnets which will secure the body.
CorvairBody_1-1_32-frame-magnet-holders.JPG

Along with magnets front and back, I've also designed tapered posts into the body which drop into the post-holes in the shock towers, so the overall body position is very well controlled with the four posts, and the magnets just have to hold it down, not locate it. The shots below are before magnets were actually installed, so it's sort of a loose fit. This is also still with the stock Axial tires, which are larger than the Wildpeaks will be (54mm OD vs. 50.3mm.) The Wildpeaks arrived on time, but micro beadlock wheels are backordered almost a month, so it will be a while before I can see this with proper tires mounted up. :mecry:

PXL_20210305_143220362.jpg
PXL_20210224_202136875~2.jpg
PXL_20210224_202421558~2.jpg
PXL_20210224_202039146~2.jpg
 
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Frederik

Supporting Member
The body is very nice! Can't wait to see the actual wheels and tires on, I think the size will be fine being 4mm less than this last picture, it will just look like a carzy build done by crazy people :) What about the wheel diameter, is it much different than the Axial ones?
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
My noob-ness is showing

As I mentioned earlier, I have exactly ZERO previous modelling or painting experience (unless you count spray painting the inside of just one Lexan body.) As such, I have no faith in my ability to prep or paint properly, so I decided to order an extra part to practice on - just the front portion so I could see headlight bezels, grill, wheel wells, and a few body panel curves.

I haven't sanded much plastic before - tons of wood and metal, but rarely plastic. This laser-sintered nylon from Shapeways is much tougher than I expected, and seems to have an odd property - it's probably just me, but it really seems like fine sandpaper has absolutely no effect on it. I tried sanding one small area for a quite a while and saw no effect. I don't just mean that I wasn't making much progress in terms of smoothing out the rough surface - I mean that no plastic was coming off on the paper AT ALL. I might as well have been rubbing plain paper on it. I stepped through a few grits from 600 on down until I hit 180. With 180 grit, I was suddenly moving material, but it still wasn't acting like any of my previous sanding experience - it was more like I was rubbing hundreds of tiny ice-cream scoops, gouging the surface and pulling up raised burrs in its wake. I'm exaggerating the effect a little for drama, but it really did seem like sanding this material was all-or-nothing: I either accomplish nothing at all, or I do pretty horrific damage!

Anyway, between my overall inexperience and my rough (pun-intended) first outing with sanding nylon, I decided to make a test grid on the practice piece, with some areas sanded before priming and others not, then another division between sanding post-priming or not, and then a final division where I could compare spray paint vs. brush on paint. The yellow brush paint is back-ordered like everything else I want, so that part is still plain, but the rest of my sanding and priming experiment is well underway. It seems like my best results are with no sanding before priming, but sanding after priming and before painting color. I'm guessing a little sanding between coats of color would also help, but I haven't gotten that far. Anyway, this is all a learning experience for me!

Also, I feel like I probably should be sanding all the nooks and crannies, but I can't seem to figure out how to sand around the headlight bezels, grill, etc. without destroying too much detail. I may just accept a slightly rough texture, but I'm certainly open to suggestions on how to make things better.

PXL_20210302_022730593~2.jpg
PXL_20210302_061157701.PORTRAIT~2.jpg
PXL_20210302_153053092.PORTRAIT.jpg

I'm also interested in getting opinions on the grill. I think I like the effect with the grill painted black, providing contrast between it and the rest of the body, and also really helping make the chrome emblem pop. My wife thinks the black grill is too dark, and that I should leave it the same grey as the rest of the lower body, or perhaps paint it a darker grey. What do you all think?

Oh, yeah - here are a few images to show the colors being used on the 1:1.
Screenshot_20201217-233743.jpg
Screenshot_20210221-231545.jpg
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
The body is very nice! Can't wait to see the actual wheels and tires on, I think the size will be fine being 4mm less than this last picture, it will just look like a carzy build done by crazy people :) What about the wheel diameter, is it much different than the Axial ones?

Hmmm... I don't know the exact wheel dimensions, but I think their diameters are roughly the same. I'll be using RC4WD "stamped stock" beadlocks.

Also, thanks for the kind words on the body. And, I think it will be very fitting if it looks like a crazy build done by crazy people... the same people who built this rig made a "rotisserie" for it and spun it around with people inside!!!
 

Frederik

Supporting Member
:laughing: crazy people confirmed!

I am no detailing expert either, but I can tell you what I would maybe try, I'm sure other more experienced will chime in anyways. For the grille, maybe just a wash with some lighter paint? (apply paint and wipe it off before it dries) I remember I had a grille in black that was just too much contrast and I weathered it with a bit of brown (I was ok with having it look dirty anyway). Being an offroad build some weathering is good anyway.

For the body texture, maybe you can take it the opposite way, and add some filler and then sand the excess filler off? I too am not sure how to go about sanding in the tight spots. Maybe with filler it would be easier as it is intended to be easy to sand off.
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
:laughing: crazy people confirmed!

I am no detailing expert either, but I can tell you what I would maybe try, I'm sure other more experienced will chime in anyways. For the grille, maybe just a wash with some lighter paint? (apply paint and wipe it off before it dries) I remember I had a grille in black that was just too much contrast and I weathered it with a bit of brown (I was ok with having it look dirty anyway). Being an offroad build some weathering is good anyway.

For the body texture, maybe you can take it the opposite way, and add some filler and then sand the excess filler off? I too am not sure how to go about sanding in the tight spots. Maybe with filler it would be easier as it is intended to be easy to sand off.

Thanks for the insights! A light wash on the grill with lighter paint sounds like an interesting idea - maybe I'll try that on the practice part to get a feel for it. As for body texture, I think you're probably right. I'm not going to try sanding down the vinyl anymore - I'll just focus on filling the porous bits and sanding it smooth. I picked up some plastic putty that I can try, and I also found some Mr. Hobby primer that claims to help with filling cracks and dips, so I may give that a try too. It would be pretty convenient if simply using a thicker primer and then sanding it back down some would do the trick!

My regular LHS failed me on paint selection, so I made a trek to a more distant location today and I finally have two different yellow paints to play with. Looking forward to comparing my yellow options and getting a little more practice trying to get a good surface out of this. Fingers crossed! At this point, I kind of wish I'd gotten more material to practice on... I guess pretty soon I'll just have to start taking chances and put paint on the real thing, but I'd love to get a little better feel for these paints before potentially ruining this nice body I just got!
 

2Beers

It's me again.
I love the looks of things going on with it.

10 out of 10 for uniqueness....

Going to be an awesome rig to drive around no doubts.

More Please.
 

joe122

Well-known member
Paint scheme A for me. Grill, sure a wash would look a bit more realistic. That texture is a tough one, no pun intended. I would try, maybe hood first, Duplicolor High Build Primer Filler. Make sure it's the High Build!! Use in well ventilated area, stinks!!! Apply relatively heavy coats, lightly sand that coat. Apply second once first coat has thoroughly cured, repeat - maybe 3 applications should get that surface more uniform. Very cool build!!! Love those inspiration photos!!!!
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
Tamiya acrylic blend/bleed where colors meet?

In not happy with my options for spray painting and would prefer to brush paint as much as possible.

Last night I tried brushing some yellow Tamiya acrylic paint on the section of hood that wasn't yet painted (previous yellow was Tamiya TS series spray.) At the edges where it meets the fender flares, it seemed to dissolve the black paint on the fenders and blend a little. The black was also brushed on Tamiya acrylic, but it's been on there several days, maybe a week, and I'd have thought it would be pretty well cured by now.

I thought that once acrylic paint was cured, it wouldn't be affected by fresh paint applied over it, but it seems like maybe that's happening to me. Is that normal? If so, how does anyone paint an edge where two colors meet with acrylic paint?

I'm hoping there's a simple explanation involving some preventable user error on my part, but right now I'm at a loss.
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
I love the looks of things going on with it.

10 out of 10 for uniqueness....

Going to be an awesome rig to drive around no doubts.

More Please.
Thanks! I'll provide more as soon as I can. I'm super excited and can't wait to get it painted... but I've got a steep learning curve trying to figure out what I'm doing with paint.

Paint scheme A for me. Grill, sure a wash would look a bit more realistic. That texture is a tough one, no pun intended. I would try, maybe hood first, Duplicolor High Build Primer Filler. Make sure it's the High Build!! Use in well ventilated area, stinks!!! Apply relatively heavy coats, lightly sand that coat. Apply second once first coat has thoroughly cured, repeat - maybe 3 applications should get that surface more uniform. Very cool build!!! Love those inspiration photos!!!!
Thanks! Luckily, paint scheme A won by a landslide in the voting on the 1:1 build, so that's what I'll be doing too.

As for rough textures, I just got some Mr Hobby Primer Surfacer 1000 yesterday, which I'm hoping is similar to your Duplicolor recommendation, but in brush-on form instead of spray. I'm going to see if I have any luck with that first, but I'll try the Duplicolor if it doesn't work. Either way, I appreciate the advice - I need all the help I can get!
 

Frizzen

Active member
So we got a call on a really cool build...
I've been watching them a while and i'm glad somebodys trying to build the Corvair!

For the grill why not leave the radiator black, then do an expanded metal looking insert in a little lighter color?

Nylon is tough and has really good abrasion and chemical resistance... but unfortunately it's also got abrasion and chemical resistance. So your finish is at best going to be more of a Scrach & Shoot rather than really smooth and glossy. "We did the whole thing in bedliner"

Oh yeah. Ed's not here, so you're going to need to do the weather report.
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
The weather is sort of fumey, toxic, and ethereal as I make chemical clouds trying to learn my way around painting!

I've started playing around with plastic filler compound and filler/primer paint, with some degree of success. I don't expect to get anything like the showroom finishes I see on other models here, and I'm still at a loss on what (if anything) I can do about the gritty effect in highly detailed areas like the headlights, but I am hopeful that I can at least mostly smooth out the larger body panels so they look less like sandpaper!

I'm glad to hear your comments on nylon and abrasion resistance - I feel a little better knowing that at least part of the problem really is the tough material, and not *just* my lack of skill (which is also a problem!)

I like the bedliner answer - MORR has already used it pretty extensively in their build, so why not yellow bedliner for the roof and hood too?!
 

UpsidedownRC

Patience Tested!
This is a great build and I like your approach. Working with 3d printed parts is what I am currently doing, experimenting with fillers, filler paints and durability. Keep up the good work.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

JonFoster

Did someone say "Bronco?"
Looks good! The design and detail work on the CAD model is fantastic!

The one thing I don't like about Shapeways (besides pricing) is that sometimes the parts using the SLS nylon material are a pain to work with. However, it is a fairly strong and durable material. Sometimes too durable.

Currently I'm working on a 1/16 truck that I've 3D printed most of the body parts and the frame using an FFF (Fused Filament Fabrication) printer and using a SLA (stereolithography) printer for the higher detail stuff. FFF garners a quicker print, but not as high details. SLA garners a more detailed print at the cost of time and is more expensive. FFF also gives a stronger finish whereas most SLA resins tend to be brittle (I'm also working on finding some better quality resins to use in the RC world). The SLS process is mix of both high detail and toughness, but is more expensive than both.

What I've found in my experience for the FFF parts is to use a really high build primer like the Rustoleum 2-n-1 Filler and Sandable primer to fill in the print lines, then sand nearly the entire primer layer back until it's smooth. Depending on the print quality, something it's required to do it a few times.
 

ebeowulf17

Supporting Member
This is a great build and I like your approach. Working with 3d printed parts is what I am currently doing, experimenting with fillers, filler paints and durability. Keep up the good work.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks for the kind words! If you find any products or methods that are especially useful as far as fillers, etc. be sure to share them here. I'm sure I'm not the only one who could use tips!

For what it's worth, I'd love to avoid using any spray products (mostly because of fumes) and so I've settled on using the Mr. Hobby line of filler/primer which I can brush on. It looks like I should be able to get acceptable results in most areas(at least by my beginner standards) with a few coats each of primer and Tamiya X-series paints. Fingers crossed! I also got some Testors Contour Putty (closest thing I could find to "filler" at the LHS this weekend) which I might try if there are some especially troublesome spots.

I've been following your Hilux thread. It's looking great - you've definitely gotten some good results with 3d printing!

Looks good! The design and detail work on the CAD model is fantastic!

The one thing I don't like about Shapeways (besides pricing) is that sometimes the parts using the SLS nylon material are a pain to work with. However, it is a fairly strong and durable material. Sometimes too durable.

Currently I'm working on a 1/16 truck that I've 3D printed most of the body parts and the frame using an FFF (Fused Filament Fabrication) printer and using a SLA (stereolithography) printer for the higher detail stuff. FFF garners a quicker print, but not as high details. SLA garners a more detailed print at the cost of time and is more expensive. FFF also gives a stronger finish whereas most SLA resins tend to be brittle (I'm also working on finding some better quality resins to use in the RC world). The SLS process is mix of both high detail and toughness, but is more expensive than both.

What I've found in my experience for the FFF parts is to use a really high build primer like the Rustoleum 2-n-1 Filler and Sandable primer to fill in the print lines, then sand nearly the entire primer layer back until it's smooth. Depending on the print quality, something it's required to do it a few times.
Thanks! I'm really happy with how the CAD model came out too - now if I can get the printed version to look half as good, I'll be in really good shape! I'm quite envious of the insane detail and smoothness in some of the resin prints I've seen. I wasn't aware that they tended to be more brittle - that's good to know. I'll probably be more careful with any hardbodies than I've been so far with my Lexan rigs... but I really like to test limits and try hard lines, so tumbles and rollovers are bound to happen - no way I'm ever building a shelf queen! I wouldn't want to print a body that couldn't take some abuse. If I ever start doing any of my own 3D printing I'll have to keep all of this in mind.

Your hybrid approach, mixing FFF and SLA parts wherever they make the most sense, sounds like a great plan! Thanks for the tips on primers and sanding. As I said in my response above, I'll be trying some Mr. Hobby brushable primer to start, but I'll keep the Rustoleum in mind as a backup plan if the Mr. Hobby isn't getting the job done.

Also, you should start a build thread for whatever you're working on now - I'd love to see what you're up to these days. I saw your old SVT Lightning thread, and the level of detail in your suspension work (while working at 1/25 scale) was really impressive!
 
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